• thoughts in flux

    Consider the evidence of time that many choose to erase . . .

    Would you ever consider preserving the ring of dust that forms around objects, or collecting the residue that clings to your hands after handling items from the past? Do you ever contemplate the absence of something whose outline has been preserved? Have you examined the mark left behind by a label or tape that was once adhered to an object, or considered the duration of time that those two objects were connected? Have you noticed how hair tangles and clogs channels, or burrows into your sweater?

    I contemplate these questions daily, which has led to a thread of research that focuses on insignificant moments and objects. My work is a collection of lines that illustrate gesture. I knot silk fiber and steel wire, developing a language that preciously demonstrates the importance of preserving and documenting history. The knots are attached to silver and fixed with gold—communicating the value of each second. The silver sheet is a timestamp, preserving the evidence of touch, and providing a surface that oxidizes naturally. Each piece is a palimpsest that records and illuminates moments in history. When the jewelry is worn, the essence of the object is transferred to the wearer, connecting the body with specific moments in time.

    Through the process of recording I have discovered “residual” marks—evidence that serves as a document of time. Oxidation causes light brown stains to accumulate on a dusty, silver surface. Piercing a silver pin through a tightly woven swatch of silk—perforates the fabric, leaving a collection of holes. Fusing a pile of finely filed specks of silver dust, permanently preserves a ring of dust. Forging a delicate wire into a paper-thin sheet of silver forms a “halo,” a loop of light, whose ghost is visible on the underside. Collectively, these marks imply absence—reminders of presence.

  • If I pierce raw silk with silver, will it be admired?
    If I fix a fine steel wire with gold, will it be cherished?
    If I present an insignificant object on silver, will it be acknowledged?
    If I preserve a stain, will it be understood?

  • to make objects

    with layers.
    that reflect the past.
    that embody language.
    that depict gesture.
    that record time.
    that incorporate fragility.
    that suggest the body.
    that provide an experience.
    imbued with ritual.

  • A halo on a dusty surface.
    A loop of light.
    A moment captured.
    Moving through the air.

  • dust

    stamp, stamp, stamp,
    the cloud rises.

    the air is full,
    remembered.

    with time,
    the air is still.

    falling to the floor,
    they settle slowly.

    a sheet,
    transparent.

    one by one they fall,
    the floor collects.

    a blanket,
    thick.

    the air is clear,
    forgotten.

  • stain

    Time collects,
    Impurities gather,
    A mark is made.
    How long has at been?

  • marking time

    Piercing,
    Piercing,
    Marking,
    Marking.

    Marking,
    Piercing,
    Piercing,
    Marking.

    Piercing,
    Piercing,
    Marking,
    Marking.

    Time.

  • palimpsest

    Unraveling,
    Cutting,
    Dying,
    Knotting,
    Taping,

    Unwrapping,
    Wearing.

    Unwrapping,
    Wearing.

    Unwrapping,
    Wearing.

    Removing,
    Reattaching.

    Remembering.